No Mind

It's the mind that makes you miss the shot
July 22nd, 2011

Introducing Krivah

For past some time I have been working on numerous “Enterprise” application. What I noticed that most of them have same bunch of problems. In majority of cases you have some data and bunch of rules to be applied on the data. When I explored this a bit I came to a list of features that I will like to have in a business management framework. Here is the initial list I came up

– Define data easily. By “easily” I mean that a Business user should be able to define data (preferably visually) or modify existing data.
– Pull data from various sources and define a collective business object.
– Define rules with a drag and drop interface.
– Define workflows.
– Define presentation of data.
– Package bunch of features as components and mix components to create applications (SCA)
– Allow individual applications to be stored on separate nodes (hardware) so that you can scale individual applications depending on demand.At the same time whole application should be available to user in a single interface, seamlessly.
– Reporting
– Incremental development of applications and components.

Since I had some free time today, I decided to start writing a framework which meets above requirements. The framework is called Krivah and is based on clojure. The code repo is available at https://github.com/vivekkhurana/krivah . Please note, at the time of writing this post, Krivah is pre-pre-alpha!. The code is for developers only. (not for faint hearted! :) )
Right now nothing special is working. Just a basic entity framework for defining entities. Current code supports only NoSQL and is based on MongoDB. But support for other database is coming soon.

Why Clojure
Clojure is a dialect of lisp that runs in JVM or .Net CLR. Lisp is a language that I find most suitable for business applications. The ability to treat code as data is a blessing for defining business rules. One can use older program source code and pass it to new function, making wrapping functions and extending functions a breeze.

What Krivah is not?
Krivah is not a generic framework. It is focused on business applications and workflow based applications to be precise. So you cannot expect to see Krivah used to build a social networking site. But expect things like inventory management, production planning etc.
To cut down on speculations, I am not trying to build SAP or anything similar. I dont think, this framework will be used by anyone beyond SME.

What is in the name?
Krivah (pronounced Kree-waah) is formed by joining two Sanskrit words Kree meaning work and Vaha meaning flow. Since one of the main focus on this framework will be business workflow, joining Kree and Vaha will mean workflow. :)

Why announcement in pre-pre-alpha ?

Its Friday night here in India and I have whole weekend. I think by Monday morning I should be able to finish couple of task and by sometime mid-next week have something usable by end-user. Since the project is going to be open source, the sooner you release the project, the better it is. :)

So stay tuned for more updates… :)